In which I, a reader, answer the Shelf Awareness questionaire.

Shelf Awareness is a daily newsletter for readers and writers that contains smart articles about the book industry, new releases, who’s appearing on TV, and other things that I usually need to know.  (It’s free, and I encourage you to sign up for it. It’s always a good way to spend a couple minutes a day.)

There’s also a fun section where people answer questions about books.

And since I was thinking about what my answers would be, I thought I’d do it myself!

On your nightstand now:

“The Enchanted Wanderer” by Nikolai Leskov, one of the novellas that Melville House has ingenously printed in book form.  It’s a quirky little tale of vignettes from of a man who is doomed never to die.  I’m really enjoying it. Also, a shout out to Melville House for being a thoroughly modern publishing company — there’s a QR code in the book to access additional information, like more short stories by Leskov, and photographs.

Favorite book when you were a child:

Too many.  I went through serious Ramona Quimby and Babysitters Club phases, but it really all does come back to Roald Dahl’s “Matilda,” which is still every bit as great a read as I can remember.  Oh, how I tried to make glasses of water float using only my mind.  (Never happened.)

Your top five authors:

Charlotte Bronte, Mary Shelley, Christopher Moore, Roald Dahl, and Stephen King.

Book you’ve faked reading:

🙂  “Heart of Darkness” — in high school AP English. I tried, really I did, but I just didn’t care. And I resorted to Cliff’s Notes. And I did fine on the test. And I don’t remember a darn thing about any of it, except for watching “Apocalypse Now.”

Book you’re an evangelist for:

I believe if everyone in the world read Christopher Moore’s “A Dirty Job,” we’d all be happier people.

Book you’ve bought for the cover:

“The Monsters of Templeton,” by Lauren Groff.  And the book was actually great.

Book that changed your life:

“Jane Eyre” is my hands down favorite book of all time.  From the moment I first read it, there’s never been another book like it.  It did a lot to awaken me to how purely awesome a book could be — I’d been a hardcore reader all my life, but this was something else.

Favorite line from a book:

(From “Jane Eyre,” Chapter 27) —

Rochester: “If you were mad, do you think I should hate you?”

Jane: “I do indeed, sir.”

Rochester: “Then you are mistaken, and you know nothing about me, and nothing about the sort of love of which I am capable. Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear. Your mind is my treasure, and if it were broken, it would be my treasure still: if you raved, my arms should confine you, and not a strait waistcoat — your grasp, even in fury, would have a charm for me: if you flew at me as wildly as that woman did this morning, I should receive you in an embrace, at least as fond as it would be restrictive. I should not shrink from you with disgust as I did from her: in your quiet moments you should have no watcher and no nurse but me; and I could hang over you with untiring tenderness, though you gave me no smile in return; and never weary of gazing into your eyes, though they had no longer a ray of recognition for me.”

And that, dear reader, is why we love Edward Fairfax Rochester despite his numerous less-than-lovable traits.

Book you most want to read again for the first time:

Today? “The Poseidon Adventure.”  Any other day, I’d say Neil Gaiman’s “The Sandman.”  To be able to take that adventure again with a totally open mind for the first time would be a gift.

If you could encourage any beginning writer, what would you say?

Don’t try to be like anyone else.  Just be you.  (And vampires don’t sparkle.  Stop it.)

🙂

 

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About JamieP

Books. Adventures. Chicago. Married. Mommy. Cat.

Posted on October 19, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Like you, Jane Eyre changed my reading life forever. Although I was a voracious reader from a young age (The Bobbsey Twins, Trixie Beldon, Nancy Drew), when I read Jane Eyre (I was 12 or 13) it rocked my world.

    Also – SO MUCH LOVE for your Twilight comment. As a huge BtVS/Ats fan (and just a vampire fan in general), sparkly vampires are just wrong. Imagine how much fun Spike would have with Edward!

    I found your blog via Twitter via Shelf Awareness, and I am looking forward to reading more from you.

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