“After the Snow” by S.D. Crockett

S.D. Crockett’s “After the Snow” is being released at a time when it can’t help but be compared to the current biggest book in the world, Suzanne Collins’ “The Hunger Games.” It’s yet another Young adult novel with a young protagonist who has to deal with some violent and scary stuff in order to survive, as so many young adult novels are these days.

Hey – that stuff sells.  Big time.

In “After the Snow” our young warrior hero is a boy named Willo, who makes his way through the barren hills and mountains of a new ice age while trying to survive and track down his recenty-vanished family.  Along his scavenging way, he becomes responsible for a young girl named Mary, and they wind up in a “city” that will probably remind any of Ms. Collins readers of some of the districts of the fictional Panem.  (The Government is over-arching and kind of scary, while the people are struggling to get by, or wealthy for shady reasons.)The book has quite a bit of violence and mature themes in it — including a few mentions of death (of adults and children) so maybe this isn’t the book for your little ones.

Willo is interesting enough to keep the book going. In fact, one of the strengths of “After the Snow,” is Crockett’s choice to write the book from Willo’s point of view, and in the broken/stylized way this wilderness boy (who wears a coat he made from the fur of a dog, who may or may not speak to him) would speak.  It reminded me a little bit of the way “A Clockwork Orange” is written in Alex’s vernacular, and how it immediately sets the scene and makes the reader sit up and take notice.

If dark and brutal young adult literature is your thing, check out “After the Snow.” It’s a pretty good read.

Advertisements

About JamieP

Books. Adventures. Chicago. Married. Mommy. Cat.

Posted on March 28, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: