The Cupcake Problem – “I was a Really Good Mom before I had Kids” by Trisha Ashworth and Amy Nobile

Modern Moms are a stressed out bunch of ladies.  Pulled in a million directions and expected to be “SuperMoms,” they find themselves working full-time, yet still being expected to run a flawless home, raise happy/smart/well-adjusted children, be in shape and sexy, have dinner on the table every night, and still pull off all those excellent mom details – like making homemade cupcakes for school events instead of (gasp) sending store-bought cupcakes in their place.

Much of this stress is caused by perception.  These women want to be seen as successful by everyone – husbands, other moms, bosses and co-workers. It’s an unfortunate fact that we’re a society that judges each other terribly, and this leads to a sense of hyper-awareness in how we’re being perceived.

You can’t be perfect all the time.  “I was a Really Good Mom before I Had Kids” is a nice, basic guidebook for ways these stressed women can find a better sense of balance.  Feeling guilt about not sending hand-written thank you notes after a birthday party? Forget it.

The subtitle of the book is “Reinventing Modern Motherhood.”  The point of this book is to help Moms find a path to greater balance and more happiness. It’s full of lists and question/answer sections to help pinpoint what the mom (who is the goal reader here) is focusing on in order to help showcase where the focus should be.  The two authors are successful working moms who have some good ideas to share.

Is it a perfect, mind-blowing book? Nope.  Some issues go deeper than cupcakes, you know?

However, I’m months away from becoming a new mom, and I’m certain that a boatload of stress is about to head my way.  Having a copy of this book around could come in handy at those moments, so it’ll hang out in my growing “Parenting” book section.  Maybe having it around will help me keep some perspective.

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About JamieP

Books. Adventures. Chicago. Married. Mommy. Cat.

Posted on June 27, 2011, in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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